Tag Archives: Mental Health

60 Christmas dinners cooked and delivered with goody bags!

What a wonderful way to spread some good Christmas Cheer!

Smiling Susan Cooking 60 Christmas Dinners
Smiling Susan Cooking 60 Christmas Dinners

The Bus Stop Club broke its record this Christmas by cooking and delivering a total of 60 Christmas dinners to individuals and families we support! This was in place of having a sit down meal together at the Centre with clients and volunteers from our various projects including After School Craft, CAP Debt Centre, MOAT Courses (1:2:1 Management of Anxiety and Trauma Recovery), Food Store Cupboard and many others who receive our support.

Each dinner was delivered to the door by one of our super volunteers with a smile and a large goody bag full of generously donated groceries and treats. We say a big thank you again to all involved from those donating and collecting food supplies to assembling meals and goody bags to driving and delivering them. Thank you! Clients have said what a difference this made at this time, with some texting or sending us a Christmas card saying thank you!

A Christmas Thank You and News!

A sincere thanks to all our supporters and friends at Christmas!

A sincere thanks to all our supporters and friends at Christmas!

A sincere thanks to all our supporters and friends at Christmas!

Dear friends and supporters of the Bus Stop Club,

Well, what an extraordinary year we have all had! We are thankful that due to several pots of COVID funding and the commitment of staff and volunteers, we were able to turn the Centre into a Meal Production Hub during our first lockdown. We cooked and delivered around 890 meals and bags of groceries to our most vulnerable clients.

We also saw some more Debt clients go debt free during this time – in all, 26 clients are now debt free thanks to the support of our local CAP team and the CAP Head Office team in Bradford.

At the Centre, the summer was spent cleaning, archiving, repairing, and learning on-line.

So when we opened the Centre again in September, we were ready to work with individuals under our 1:1 M.O.A.T. coaching programme, which is running well, and which we plan to continue over the next 2 years. Regular donations of food, both fresh and store cupboard are available for the local community at the Centre every morning.

Instead of our local families coming to the Centre on Wednesdays for After School Club, we now go to them, with our delivery of Craft Packs and groceries every Wednesday!

Currently we are planning for a different Christmas season, with Christmas bags of goodies and presents for our CAP clients, goody bags for others, and a full Christmas roast dinner, cooked in the Centre and delivered during Christmas week by our lovely band of volunteers. This would simply not have been possible without your donations of treats, money and practical help. Thank you.

Whatever Christmas looks like for you this year, may you know that you have made a difference through supporting our work here in Ferndown and East Dorset.

THANK YOU!

Susan and the team.

Bus Stop Club
TRC Ferndown

Management of Anxiety and Trauma Recovery 1-2-1 Coaching

Management of Anxiety and Recovery from Trauma Courses

M.O.A.T. 1-2-1 Coaching

This new 1-2-1 coaching course has been running since September at the Turbary Resource Centre, and is open to anyone who wants to improve their wellbeing. Susan Sutherland is a mental health practitioner and has been studying Trauma Based Care, which has enabled her to write and present these informative and practical courses. The course is split into 2 sections: anxiety management and trauma recovery. Participants have found that they make much personal progress in coping with anxiety and experiences of trauma. This helps them to have better health and well being.

Key physiological information is conveyed in a way that is easy to understand. This, in turn, empowers participants to put into practice the various practical steps to wellbeing. Each attendee follows along in their own visually well-presented folder and are welcome to ask questions. Due to the psychoeducational nature of the course it is a permitted activity during lock down restrictions and adheres to social distancing and hygiene measures.

A registration fee of £20 is payable to attend weekly coaching sessions of 50 minutes, covering both parts of the course. Those who attend can opt to do either just Part 1, or both Part 1 and 2. 

The availability of individual coaching is proving to be a timely resource. benefitting one and all especially at this season of pandemic. It is open to anyone over 16 from the wider area of Dorset.

Please feel free to pass this information on to a friend or contact who may find it helpful.

Mental Health Awareness Week (18-24 May) – Interview from Healthwatch Dorset

We interviewed Healthwatch Dorset volunteer Catriona, who comes from a professional background of working in the field of mental health as a counsellor, and she offered her experience, tips and helpful resources.

Why did you become a Healthwatch Dorset volunteer?
“I have recently signed up to be a Healthwatch Dorset volunteer, I was triggered to be more proactive with my time when the lockdown announcement was made in relation to COVID-19.  I was interested in volunteering for Healthwatch because of my professional background in health and well-being.
“I have many years’ experience in the charity sector, helping young people and families with social, emotional and mental health struggles.  This has included therapy as well as support and motivation, offering opportunities for something as simple as a ‘walk and a talk’ or a call of encouragement to get out of bed in the morning.  I have also found advocacy an important part of my role, because when you most need help it’s often hard to find the energy to access agencies like the benefits system, housing or the health service.”

With your experience of working in mental health, can you tell us about some of the telling signs that a person may be feeling anxious or depressed?
“It’s important that everyone looks after himself or herself before they can really look after anyone else.  It’s important to ‘notice’ how you are – this takes a moment – to stop and ask yourself, how am I feeling, what am I doing, what do I need?
“Stress often triggers us into exaggerating our behaviour, so if you tend to over eat, you might eat more.  If you find running is a good way of calming yourself you might over-exercise, pushing yourself to run further or faster.  If you struggle to get out of bed and get dressed, you are likely to stay under your duvet if your mental health takes a downturn.
“Noticing this and being able to acknowledge what you are coping with is the first step to helping yourself and then helping others.  ‘Noticing’ takes a bit of practice because so many of us are used to rushing and filling every minute of the day with ‘doing’ something, but it’s so important because each of us, individually, is the expert on ourselves and knowing what we need.  The next, and really important step is to be kind to yourself – acknowledging and naming the challenges you are facing.
“The very same skills transfer well to helping others; noticing when someone has changed their behaviour or their way of reacting to you is key to helping.
“When you see changes that concern you, acknowledge that you’ve seen this and ask what the trouble is, demonstrating your concern and being kindly curious.  You may have to ask several times before you get a genuine answer, but it’s work persevering and when you get the answer you can offer support.”

Could you suggest some positive coping techniques?
“There are many well documented techniques for coping and again, it’s about knowing yourself, and what’s good for you.
“At the start of the lockdown I thought it was a good opportunity to do something I haven’t done before, I bought wool and knitting needles, but that was a mistake!  I don’t enjoy knitting and I never will!  I’ve now returned to the things that I know work well for me, walking and cycling, reading, cooking and keeping in touch with my friends and family.
“The one thing that is universally helpful, when coping with uncertainty is having a routine; again there are many variations of routine.  It might be that a very loose routine is best for you, or you might prefer something more structured, again knowing what suits you is important.  If you find yourself saying ‘I should…’ this is a critical voice in your head and some self-compassion is needed.
“Putting some structure into the day, and the night as well is a helpful coping skill, in the current situation, knowing what day of the week it is and marking the weekend in some way will help with isolation.
“It’s easy to feel helpless because COVID-19 affects the whole world and so much is out of our control, but keeping to small regular plans will offer a sense of agency and feeling grounded in your personal world.
“We constantly hear that we are living in unprecedented times, and this is true, we are all coping with challenges to our mental health on a daily basis and we live with global uncertainty about what will happen next.  We can only do our best and accepting our anxiety, acknowledging the stress and the worry and that these will lead to difficult feelings will keep us from being judgemental and harsh on ourselves and others.
“If you find you are being hard on yourself, ask yourself what you would advise your best friend to do about your concerns.  You will find it easier to access your kindness and compassion for him or her and then you can take the same action for yourself.
“It can be helpful to schedule a ‘worry time’ into your day.  Have a regular moment when you consider everything that’s worrying you and then agree with yourself to let go of your worry until the same time the next day.”

Healthwatch Dorset kindly thank Catriona for sharing her knowledge of the field and shared experience, to help others who may be feeling that their mental health is being impacted at this time. For more information about what they do please follow this link –> Healthwatch Dorset

Open door at the centre

HOW TO GET IN TOUCH WITH US

Susan Sutherland the Project Manager for the Turbary Resource Centre on the Heatherlands Estate can be contacted on 07866 692528 to help with any queries during the COVID-19 pandemic any morning 9:00 – 12:00 or after 3:00pm. This can include our major offerings of M.O.A.T. (1-2-1 coaching in Management of Anxiety and Trauma Recovery), CAP Debt Help and food store cupboard etc.

Alternatively you can send Susan a text on 07866 692528 or an email at ssutherland@hotmail.co.uk